AGILE TOOL SUPPORT: JIRA SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR GUIDE – Permissions & Security

Permissions and Security

What is an issue ‘security level’?

Issue security levels allow you to control who can see individual issues within a project.

A security level’s members may consist of:

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  • Individual users
  • Groups
  • Project roles
  • Issue roles such as ‘Reporter’, ‘Project Lead’, and ‘Current Assignee’
  • ‘Anyone’ (eg. to allow anonymous access)
  • A (multi-)user picker custom field.
  • A (multi-)group picker custom field.

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Here is a list the different global permissions and the functions they secure:

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  • JIRA System Administrators – Permission to perform all JIRA administration functions.
  • JIRA Administrators – Permission to perform most JIRA administration functions. A user with JIRA Administrators will be able to log in to JIRA without the JIRA Users permission, but may not be able to perform all regular user functions (e.g. edit their profile) unless they also belong to a group that has the JIRA Users permission.
  • JIRA Users – Permission to log in to JIRA.
  • Browse Users – Permission to view a list of all JIRA user names and group names.

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Creating an issue security scheme

1. Depending on the Jira version, Choose Issues > Issue Security Schemes to open the ‘Issue Security Schemes’ page, which lists all the issue security schemes currently available in your JIRA installation.

JIRA permissions and security - admin

2. Click the Add Issue Security Scheme button

JIRA permissions and security - security schemes

3. In the Add Issue Security Scheme form, enter a name for the issue security scheme, and a short description of the scheme. Then click the Add button.

4. You will return to the Issue Security Schemes page, which now contains the newly added scheme.

JIRA permissions and security - issue security schemes

Adding a security level to an issue security scheme

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  • Choose Issues > Issue Security Schemes to open the ‘Issue Security Schemes’ page.
  • Click the name of any scheme, or the link Security Levels (in the Operations column) to open the Edit Issue Security Levels page.
  • In the Add Security Level box, enter a name and description for your new security level and then click Add Security Level.

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Setting the Default Security Level for an issue security scheme

You can choose to specify a Default Security Level for your issue security scheme.

The Default Security Level is used when issues are created. If the reporter of an issue does not have the permission ‘Set Issue Security’, then the issue’s security level will be set to the Default Security Level. If the project’s issue security scheme does not have a Default Security Level, then the issue’s security level will be set to ‘None’. (A security level of ‘None’ means that anybody can see the issue.)

1. Choose Issues > Issue Security Schemes to open the ‘Issue Security Schemes’ page.

2. Click the name of any scheme or the link Security Levels to open the Edit Issue Security Levels page.

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  • To set the ‘default’ security level for an issue security scheme, locate the appropriate Security Level and click its Default link (in the Operations column).
  • To remove the ‘default’ security level from an issue security scheme, click the ‘Change default security level to “None”‘ link (near the top of the page).

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Adding users/groups/project roles to a security level

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  • Choose Issues > Issue Security Schemes to open the ‘Issue Security Schemes’ page.
  • Click the name of any scheme or the link Security Levels to open the Edit Issue Security Levels page.
  • Locate the appropriate security level and click its Add link (in the Operations column), which opens the Add User/Group/Project Role to Issue Security Level page.
  • Select the appropriate user, group or project role, then click the Add button.
  • Repeat steps 4 and 5 until all appropriate users and/or groups and/or project roles have been added to the security level.

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Assigning an issue security scheme to a project

1. Choose Projects > Projects to open the ‘Projects’ page. Select the name of the project of interest. The Project Summary page is displayed.

JIRA permissions and security - projects

2. In the Permissions section of the Project Summary page, click the link corresponding to the Issues label to open the Associate Issue Security Scheme to Project page. This will either be the name of the project’s current issue security scheme, or the word None.

JIRA permissions and security - permissions

3. Select the issue security scheme that you want to associate with this project.

JIRA permissions and security -associate scheme

4. If there are no previously secured issues (or if the project did not previously have an issue security scheme), skip the next step.

5. If there are any previously secured issues, select a new security level to replace each old level. All issues with the security level from the old scheme will now have the security level from the new scheme. You can choose ‘None’ if you want the security to be removed from all previously secured issues.

6. Click the ‘Associate‘ button to associate the project with the issue security scheme.

JIRA permissions and security -associate security

Deleting an issue security scheme

1. Choose Issues > Issue Security Schemes to open the ‘Issue Security Schemes’ page, which lists all the issue security schemes currently available in your JIRA installation.

2. Click the Delete link (in the Operations column) for the scheme that you want to delete. You cannot delete an issue security scheme if it is associated with a project. To do so, you must first remove any associations between the issue security scheme and projects in your JIRA installation.


BY: IT SERVICE DESK AT INFOWARE STUDIOS


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Agile Tool Support: JIRA System Administrator Guide – JIRA Workflows

JIRA Training

As part of our JIRA training modules, we have developed instruction guides to assist users when making use of JIRA as an Agile tool. In this blog series, we will be providing tutorials for JIRA System Administrators on how to perform certain functions in JIRA. Part 1 deals with the Issues and Fields elements in JIRA. In Part 2, we take a look at JIRA Workflows.

JIRA Workflows

A JIRA workflow is the set of steps (or statuses) and transitions that an issue goes through during its lifecycle. Workflows typically represent business processes.

JIRA ships with a built-in workflow called ‘jira’. This workflow, also known as the ‘system workflow’ cannot be edited, but you can customise the issue lifecycle by initially copying the system workflow or creating new workflows from scratch. Each workflow can be associated with particular projects and (optionally) particular issue type(s), via a workflow scheme.

JIRA’s system workflow

JIRA Workflows system

JIRA workflows consist of steps and transitions:

step represents a workflow’s current status for an issue. An issue can exist in one step only at any point in time. Each workflow step corresponds to a linked status. When an issue is moved into a particular step, its status field is updated to the value of the step’s linked status. In the diagram above, the blue boxes represent steps/statuses.

transition is a link between two steps. A transition allows an issue to move from one step to another step. For an issue to be able to progress from one particular step to another, a transition must exist that links those two steps. Note that a transition is a one-way link, so if an issue needs to move back and forth between two steps, two transitions need to be created.

About ‘Open’ and ‘Closed’ issues

Within JIRA an issue is determined to be Open or Closed based on the value of its Resolution field not its Status field.

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  • An issue is determined to be Open if its Resolution field has not been set.
  • An issue is determined to be Closed if its Resolution field has a value (e.g. FixedCannot Reproduce).

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This is true regardless of the current value of the issue’s Status field (OpenIn Progress, etc).

So if you need your workflow to force an issue to be Open or Closed, you will need to set the issue’s Resolution field during a transition. There are two ways to do this:

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  • Set the Resolution field automatically via a post function.
  • Prompt the user to choose a Resolution via a screen.

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Adding a new status

Select Administration > Issues > Statuses to open the View Statuses page, which lists all statuses, along with a form underneath to add a new status.

JIRA Workflows - view statuses

Complete the Add New Status form towards the end of the page. The View Statuses page can be used to edit and delete Statuses.

Adding a new workflow

Select Administration > Issues > Workflows to open the Workflows page, which shows a list of all existing workflows in your system.

JIRA Workflows - existing workflows

Create a new workflow in JIRA using either of the following methods:

1. Create a ‘blank’ workflow by first clicking the Add Workflow button and in the resulting Add Workflow dialog box:

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  • Type a Name (usually 2-3 words) to identify your new workflow.
  • (Optional) Type a detailed Description of your new workflow.
  • Click the Add button. The workflow will open in edit mode, showing your new workflow containing a step called Open. If you are viewing your workflow inDiagram edit mode, you will see which has an incoming transition called Create.

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2. Copy an existing workflow (useful if your new workflow can created by applying modifications to an existing workflow), by clicking the Copy link next to the existing workflow and in the resulting Copy Workflow dialog box:

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  • Type a Workflow Name (usually 2-3 words) to identify your new workflow.
  • (Optional) Type a detailed Description of your new workflow.
  • Click the Copy button. The workflow will open in edit mode, showing the layout of your copied workflow.

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To access inactive workflows, click the Inactive list heading to expand the list of inactive workflows.

Once you have created your new workflow (especially if you created a ‘blank’ workflow) you may want to customise it by adding and/or editing steps and transitions as we discussed earlier.

When you have finished customising your new workflow it must be activated by following this steps:

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  • Create a workflow scheme that references your workflow and optionally associate it with the relevant issue type(s).
  • Associate the workflow scheme with the relevant project(s).

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BY: IT SERVICE DESK AT INFOWARE STUDIOS


 

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Agile project management tools

There are many agile project management tools out there. To name a few that we have tried and tested: Pivotal Tracker, VersionOne, Scrumy and Jira.

We have settled on Jira as the best agile project management tool on the market at the moment, but our reasons for selecting our best of breed agile project management tools is not only focused on agile project management, as there is more to an agile organisation than agile projects.

Comparison of Agile Project management tools

So here is a comparison of the main characteristics of these agile tools:

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Jira: Agile project management tool of choice

Since at Infoware Studios we focus on not only agile project management, but on shifting your organisation to become agile end-to-end, Jira is our tool of choice. Jira assists to manage an agile organisation end-to-end including aspects like production support, costing, governance and people planning straight through to tracking and managing projects. Thus although tools like VersionOne come close to Jira in the agile project management tool space, our tool of choice after using all of the above tools on our projects are Jira.


BY: TANIA VAN WYK DE VRIES, CEO OF INFOWARE STUDIOS


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Agile Tool Support: JIRA System Administrator Guide – Issues and Fields

JIRA Training

As part of our JIRA training modules, we have developed instruction guides to assist users when making use of JIRA as an Agile tool. In this blog series, we will be providing tutorials for JIRA System Administrators on how to perform certain functions in JIRA, starting with the Issues and Fields elements in JIRA.

Issues Types in JIRA

Everyone’s needs are different and so JIRA also allows you to add, edit and delete your own custom issue types. You can also control the set of available issue types for each project by Associating Issue Types with Projects.

Creating an issue type

Step 1: Log in as a user with the JIRA Administrators.

Step 2: Select Administration > Issues > Issue Types to open the Issue Types page, which lists all issue types.

Issue Types 1
Different JIRA issue Types

Step 3: Click the Add Issue Type button to open the Add New Issue Type dialog box

Add new Issue type in JIRA

Step 4: Add New Issue Type and click the add button. You can Delete or Edit by going to Administration > Issues > Issue Types to open the Issue Types page and click the Edit link.

Fields in JIRA

JIRA enables you to add custom fields in addition to the built-in fields and you could choose to create this field as a Free Text Field, in which users can type whatever they wish, or as a Select List, which will force users to select from a list of pre-defined options.

To create a new field, associate it with a context, and add it to a screen:

Step 1: Select Administration > Issues > Fields > Custom Fields (tab) to open the Custom Fields page.

Step 2: Click the Add Custom Field button.

JIRA Fields Create Custom field in JIRA

Step 3: Select the appropriate type of field for your custom field, in this instance we will choose Text Field.

Step 4: Click the Next button to open the Create Custom Field – Details (Step 2 of 2) page.

Create Custom field in JIRA 2

Step 5: The Field Name will appear as the custom field’s title in both entering and retrieving information on issues, whereas the Field Description is displayed beneath the data entry field when entering new issues and editing existing issues, but not when browsing issues.

Step 6: Select an appropriate Search Template (see above). Pre-configured search templates are available for each shipped custom field type. A description of each search template will appear next to the select list when you select one.

Step 7: Select one or any number of ‘Issue Types‘ to which this custom field will be available. Alternatively, select ‘Any issue type‘ to make the custom field available to all Issue Types. You can change this in the future if you need to.

Step 8: Select the applicable context, that is, the ‘Project(s)‘ to which the custom field will be available. Alternatively, select ‘Global context‘ to make the custom field available to all projects. Click the ‘Finish‘ button.

Step 9: This will bring you to the screen association page. Select a screen, or screen tab, on which to display your newly created custom field. You must associate a field with a screen before it will be displayed. New fields will be added to the end of a tab and click on update.

Associating fields in JIRA

Newly created custom field will be displayed in a summary of all custom fields in your JIRA system. You can edit, delete or configure custom fields here.

Summary of custom fields in JIRA


BY: IT SERVICE DESK AT INFOWARE STUDIOS


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